Review: Autumn: An Anthology for the Changing Seasons

Autumn: An Anthology for the Changing Seasons Autumn: An Anthology for the Changing Seasons by Melissa Harrison
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

As the world turns once again on the equinox, nights draw in, the sunshine from summer has been converted into nature’s bounty, mist rolls over fields and a new smell permeates the sharper mornings. Gone are the acid greens of spring and deeper shades of summer, now we have leaves turning rich reds, bold yellows and mellow browns. The swallows who arrived early summer, zoom across the fields one final time before leaving for Africa. Autumn has arrived.

Just seconds ago I was in a concrete jungle, but now I stand surrounded by damp earth, wood and October’s sepia tones – Will Harper-Penrose

So begins the final book in this series of seasons that I have read. Melissa Harrison has again gathered together a fine collection of classic prose and poetry as well as the current stalwarts of our rich seam of nature writing in the UK. Most importantly is bringing to our attention the newest authors and writers who seek their inspiration from their own patch of the natural world. To be honest, they are all good, but there are a few that are outstanding, in particular, Jane Adams, Will Harper-Penrose and Megan Shersby. I am hoping that the chance that all these authors have had to appear in print will pay off in abundance in years to come. If you want a book to read that has those evocative smells and the whiff of bonfire then this is absolutely perfect. Great little book, another beautiful cover and a cracking series.

View all my reviews

Spread the love

2 Comments

  1. DoingDewey

    This sounds like a fun collection! I don't do much seasonal reading, but I like the idea and am considering trying to do more, maybe starting with some cute holiday novels this December 🙂

  2. Paul Cheney

    I don't generally, but this along with the other three in the series seem appropriate. I am only reading one Christmas book this year, A Christmas Cornucopia by Mark Forsyth on the language of Christmas

Leave a Reply

© 2020 Halfman, Halfbook

Theme by Anders NorénUp ↑

%d bloggers like this: